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Gunsmoke 149

Waste and Recycling Services

This article provided by  the ACT NoWaste Education Team as a followup to the GCC public meeting 14/10/2020. Bulky Waste Collections Bulky waste collections started in Gungahlin and Tuggeranong on 15 July 2020 for ALL households. The existing service for concession card holders is still available in all ACT suburbs.

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Gungahlin Land Releases 2020-21

The availability of land in the ACT is driven by the ACT’s Government Land Release Program. A four-year Indicative Land Release Program  accompany’s each Territory Budget which sets out the Government’s intended land releases of residential, mixed use, commercial, industrial, and community and non-urban land. The most recent four-year indicative

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5 Reasons to Don a Mask and Shop Local

– Gina Kingston – BeYouTifulStyle With the advent of COVID-19 Australian’s have embraced online shopping to the extent that our letters are delivered less frequently so that more parcels can be delivered.   While on-lining shopping may assist with physical distancing, here are five reasons to don a mask, sanitise

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Gungahlin Cinema and DHA Office Parking Decisions

The Development Applications (DAs) for both the Gungahlin Cinema complex (DA 201936502) and Defence Housing Australia (DHA) office block (DA 201936603) were both recently approved. In both cases the proponent (ie. the developer) included significantly fewer car parking spaces in their plans for each development than required by the ACT

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Our Future Gungahlin Hindu Temple

– Ralitsa Dimitrova           It has been a long time since the concept for building a Hindu temple (Mandir) with a large community facility in Gungahlin has been conceived. There have been long years of hard work, extensive public consultation, fundraising, and numerous volunteers devoting their

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The Future of the Gungahlin Town Centre

More than three years ago, in November 2016, the Gungahlin Community Council (GCC) raised these concerns with the Environment, Planning and Sustainable Development Directorate (EPSDD) based on strong community feedback regarding the high-rise residential developments at the Western edge of the Town Centre including Geocon’s Infinity Towers and Mezzo, Ruby,

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Converting the ACT Natural Gas Network to Renewables

ACT Gas Meter

EvoEnergy is investigating ways to convert the Natual Gas Infrastructure to renewable gas. Renewable gas comes from the conversion of organic waste to methane and hydrogen produced from renewable electricity. The investigation includes an experimental project at the Fyshwick CIT campus. Members of the ACT Energy Consumer Reference Council (ECRC)

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The Frogs of Gungahlin

Pobblebonk

[one_third]– Anke Maria Hoefer While many activities are on hold at the moment, we still have plenty of options to keep ourselves busy and engaged. A great way of getting active is a walk – on your own or with a walking buddy keeping an appropriate distance – to your local wetland or creek. With a bit of luck, you will hear some frogs calling in their desire to find a mate, triggered by the recent rains. Many different frog species call Gungahlin their home and the Mulligans Flat area and the Forde Wetland are amongst the frog-hotspots in Canberra. Most other wetlands, ponds, dams and the beautiful Ginninderra Creek provide important habitat for our local frogs, which is much needed to support these amazing animals. Similar to the human COV-19 Pandemic, frogs are threatened globally by a fungal skin disease, called chytridiomycosis, or chytrid fungus for short. In Australia alone, over 40 frog species have significantly declined over the past decades and 13 species have become extinct or are almost extinct. Scientists all around the world are studying the impact of the chytrid fungus and potential mitigation processes. We as a community can help as well by minimizing any additional threats to our local frogs, creating and protecting good frog-habitat, and admiring these creatures from afar. Spotting a frog is not an easy task as they are mostly nocturnal = active at night, and very well camouflaged. However, hearing a frog is much easier, especially after dark, and can be done by anyone. And it is getting even better: each frog species has a different call! So, by learning the calls of your local frogs you will be able to identify the frogs that live in your local wetland/creek. Now is the perfect time to get started. With the arrival of cooler temperatures and shorter days, the frog activities are winding down for winter, only to get back into full swing in late winter/early spring. Currently, you can still hear the Common Eastern froglet’s call (Crinia signifera). A crick-crick-crick, sometimes described as a ratchet. Later in winter, the Whistling Tree Frogs (Litoria verreauxii) will join in with its series of whistling sounds weeeee-weeeee-weeeee. Once the warmer days return, one species after the other will re-emerge and start calling. When things are in full swing you might be able to hear up to eight species calling at a pond. We shall introduce these to you in due time. The FrogWatch Program, run by the Ginninderra Catchment Group, teaches people how to identify frog species and how to help monitor these awesome creatures. The program runs an annual October FrogCensus across the Capital Region. If you would like to become a FrogWatcher, please contact Anke Maria, the Frogwatch Coordinator, frogwatch@ginninderralandcare.org.au, 62783309)[/one_third] [two_third_last]– Anke Maria Hoefer While many activities are on hold at the moment, we still have plenty of options to keep ourselves busy and engaged. A great way of getting active is a walk – on your own or with a walking buddy keeping an appropriate distance – to your local wetland or creek. With a bit of luck, you will hear some frogs calling in their desire to find a mate, triggered by the recent rains. Many different frog species call Gungahlin their home and the Mulligans Flat area and the Forde Wetland are amongst the frog-hotspots in Canberra. Most other wetlands, ponds, dams and the beautiful Ginninderra Creek provide important habitat for our local frogs, which is much needed to support these amazing animals. Similar to the human COV-19 Pandemic, frogs are threatened globally by a fungal skin disease, called chytridiomycosis, or chytrid fungus for short. In Australia alone, over 40 frog species have significantly declined over the past decades and 13 species have become extinct or are almost extinct. Scientists all around the world are studying the impact of the chytrid fungus and potential mitigation processes. We as a community can help as well by minimizing any additional threats to our local frogs, creating and protecting good frog-habitat, and admiring these creatures from afar. Spotting a frog is not an easy task as they are mostly nocturnal = active at night, and very well camouflaged. However, hearing a frog is much easier, especially after dark, and can be done by anyone. And it is getting even better: each frog species has a different call! So, by learning the calls of your local frogs you will be able to identify the frogs that live in your local wetland/creek. Now is the perfect time to get started. With the arrival of cooler temperatures and shorter days, the frog activities are winding down for winter, only to get back into full swing in late winter/early spring. Currently, you can still hear the Common Eastern froglet’s call (Crinia signifera). A crick-crick-crick, sometimes described as a ratchet. Later in winter, the Whistling Tree Frogs (Litoria verreauxii) will join in with its series of whistling sounds weeeee-weeeee-weeeee. Once the warmer days return, one species after the other will re-emerge and start calling. When things are in full swing you might be able to hear up to eight species calling at a pond. We shall introduce these to you in due time. The FrogWatch Program, run by the Ginninderra Catchment Group, teaches people how to identify frog species and how to help monitor these awesome creatures. The program runs an annual October FrogCensus across the Capital Region. If you would like to become a FrogWatcher, please contact Anke Maria, the Frogwatch Coordinator, frogwatch@ginninderralandcare.org.au, 62783309)[/two_third_last]

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Acknowledgement

Supported_by_ACTGovt_Small

The Gungahlin Community Council receives support and funding from the ACT Government

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